How do you downsize, or declutter, your home?


5/05/2017


Whether you’re packing up to travel the world, or retiring into something more manageable, at some point in your life you will likely be faced with the need to downsize or declutter.The end result is nirvana – a clean and organised home housing only those belongings that you truly love. But the steps along the way can be both time consuming and frustrating, especially when you’re not sure what to do with all the “stuff”.So where do you start?Survey the scene and ask yourself:

  • How much space do I have to work with?
  • What do I absolutely need to keep?
  • What can I throw out?
  • What might family or friends want?
  • What can be sold?
The last question can be the most difficult to answer.Almost anything can be sold, but how much is it worth? If you list it for a price no one will pay, you could spend weeks staring at it wondering whether you need to drop the price.Even worse if it sells, and you find out it was worth 10x more.Listings on Gumtree and Facebook eliminate the valuable opportunity to pit buyers against each other – which ultimately helps you get a better price. And garage sales can be painstaking.There is one way to solve both problems: put it to auction. And if you can, get a professional valuer to give you an indication of its worth before you set the reserve.We asked online auction site Allbids (based in Fyswhick) about how the auction process works, and how they help Canberrans who are downsizing or decluttering.1. Free valuationTo start, Allbids provide a free valuation service, performed by expert valuers so you can get a true indication of the value of your art, antiques, furniture, collectables, jewellery, and so on.2. Photos and listingFollowing valuation, Allbids take professional photos of everything you want to sell, and create individual listings for each item. You can opt to have it all taken away (so buyers can pick up from Allbids), or sell items straight out of your home (which works well for estate sales).3. MarketingThe reserve is set, the items are listed, so it’s time to sell!150,000 people are registered to bid on Allbids, so you immediately gain access to a huge database of locals ready to buy.But the magic happens when their far-reaching platform helps someone in New York or Hong Kong who really wants what you’re selling, find it, bid on it, and have it delivered to their door.If you want to watch the process, you can see your listing any time, and even direct friends and family to check it out.4. Sale and pickupAllbids deal with the buyers, collect the funds and handle the pick-ups. They work on commission only, which ensures they only get paid once things get sold (and they obviously work hard to get you a good price!).And that’s it! Your extra “stuff” is gone, your house is nirvana, and you’re that little bit richer. (Or a lot richer, depending on what’s in your house!)So if you’re trying to downsize, or declutter, it may be worth considering an online auction.If you would like Allbids’ help deciding what can be sold, and what it’s worth, call 02 6239 2262 or visit ALLBIDS.This article was first published on The Riot ACT Website by Rachel Ziv https://the-riotact.com/how-do-you-downsize-or-declutter-your-home/202553

The Lobby: ideas for future use?


7/04/2017


The Lobby is one of Canberra’s most iconic buildings, although on a lesser scale than the surrounding national institutions such the two Parliament Houses and the beautiful National Library of Australia. Located on national land, the National Capital Authority has responsibility for the building. Situated on King George Terrace, almost in the centre of the Parliamentary Triangle and overlooking the National Rose Garden, it is a building full of memories. Like many readers, I have been to weddings, book launches, poetry readings and memorable family get-togethers in the space. The Lobby was a restaurant and function centre for almost 50 years and was the choice of meeting place of political lobbyists with expense accounts, politicians, and senior Government officials, including the odd spook.After finally closing its doors at the beginning of the year, the future of the Lobby remains uncertain. The Lobby stopped functioning as an a la carte restaurant some years ago, although the elegant, glass-walled building had been a popular venue for weddings and functions. The attached Pork Barrel café and bakery in the kiosk part of the building attracted a day-time crowd and was well-patronised but ceased trading at the same time as The Lobby. The National Capital Authority was approached for an update about the future of the building but did not provide any information about possible future uses. I have seen references to the building being heritage-listed and if this is the case, the building should remain intact, but with an indeterminate function. The sale of all fixtures and fittings early this year means an easy transition was limited for any potential entrepreneurial local restauranteur willing to try something a bit different. Perhaps someone else, even from interstate, cashed-up from another enterprise, may tackle the space and create something that will become a go-to destination. Parking had been cited as a possible problem for the venue, but with paid parking in the Parliamentary Triangle, and the National Library car park barely 200 metres away, parking is mostly readily available. So unless the National Capital Authority can negotiate a restaurant lease, consideration should be given to repurposing the building.One idea discussed with interested parties could provide a possible solution to a long-standing issue. The ACT does not have a venue that could be described as a centre for indigenous culture for the traditional custodians and owners of the land. As The Lobby is on traditional land, surely there is room for at least a discussion that the land is returned to the traditional owners for cultural purposes. Its function could be a central repository for any collections of artefacts, or it could be easily converted into an art gallery for indigenous art, with a strong emphasis on local indigenous artists. The building is flooded with natural light and with a flexible track lighting system and moveable screens, the existing building could provide an excellent gallery space.For the time being, The Lobby sadly stands empty and just a little overgrown. At least it is not boarded up, nor the windows covered in newspaper. As we have no indication of the future of the building, it is interesting to pause and reflect on The Lobby’s past. Until 1988, it was the closest restaurant to the Australian Parliament, other than the House dining room. After Parliament moving up the hill in 1988, it inevitably became less frequented as it was no longer a quick dash across King George Terrace, and as new lobbyists and MPs came into Canberra perhaps found other restaurants more to their liking.The building was opened on 1 July 1968 by the then Federal Treasurer, a certain Mr McMahon. At the time, the Canberra Times commented it was ‘no mere hash house for coach parties’. It was anticipated it ‘would provide a sophisticated menu six nights a week’ and the décor had been ‘done by Lady (Marion) Hall Best’, interior decorator to the then rich and famous. The name was very appropriate as the restaurant was intended for lobbyists with expense accounts. The main diners were the politicians and bureaucrats who were being lobbied, although management did attempt to attract a local crowd when Parliament was not sitting. Sunday luncheons were offered as ‘a traditional Sunday dinner with ‘a grand 3-course luncheon of roast turkey or pork $3 (children $1-75), and Devonshire Tea served on Sunday afternoon’. By the end of 1969, there was a Dinner Dance each Friday night with music provided by the “Lobby Trio”.Apparently, service got off to a roaring start, and the owners were reputed to have covered all expenses within the first six weeks. A refreshment kiosk soon opened to meet the needs of tourists who were more interested in a pie and sauce. At the time of opening, there was little in the way of fine dining competition with most restaurants contained in dining rooms in motels, although I hope this statement unleashes a flurry of comments and memories of other restaurants of the era.So even though the future of The Lobby is still unknown, I wonder what personal views readers have about its future?Photos by Maryann MussaredThis article was first published on The Riot ACT Website by Maryann Mussared https://the-riotact.com/the-lobby-ideas-for-future-use/200075

How to raise funds for your charity or community organisation


4/04/2017


Raising funds for a charity or community organisation can be hard work.It’s not that Canberrans aren’t generous. In fact, according to the latest NAB Charitable Giving Index, charity donations grew by 6.3% between 2015 and 2016. Residents in Deakin were crowned the most generous with an average donation of $258 per person, and O-Connor was named the most generous suburb by percentage of income.But people can only be generous when they know who you are and what your organisation stands for. And if your charity has no marketing budget, how do you get the word out and start raising money?According to Giving Australia, the answer may lie in your ability to embrace new technologies: “In response to the decreasing effectiveness of traditional approaches, many charities are investing in technologies making it easier to give through online or digital giving.”There are a number of ways to go about this (such as Crowdfunding websites), but often charity organisers find themselves as just another number in a line of hopeful not-for-profits hoping to raise money.One company determined to change this is local auction website Allbids. CEO Rob Evans and his team help charities turn product or service donations into cash via online auctions; completely commission-free.“Charity organisers often find that Canberra businesses are very generous when it comes to supporting local causes,” says Rob. “And while they may not be able to donate lots of money, they can donate goods and services which are as good as money once sold.”According to a Giving Australia study, Australian business gave $6.2 billion to charities between 2015 and 2016. 35% of that was through goods and services, rather than financial donations. All things considered, it seems to be a no-lose situation for all. The charity gets a valuable product or service voucher that can be auctioned off for money, and the business gets a tax write-off plus a valuable opportunity to position itself as a charitable organisation.Allbids have been helping charities turn product and service donations into cash for years. Rob says Allbids services enable a charity’s silent and live auctions as part of a community event or charity dinner to reach not only the people in the room, but their database of 150,000 buyers Australia wide.“We come out to the event and set up screens so people can see what they’re bidding on,” says Rob. “Then they can either bid online on phones or tablets, or via SMS until the hammer goes down.”This will be happening at the Karinya House Charity Gala Dinner on May 5, with the auction items available on Allbids for two weeks before the event, and the final hour of the auction live at the gala.One charity organiser who can’t speak highly enough of Allbids is Martin Fisk, CEO of Menslink.Menslink is a Canberra based charity which supports young men aged 12 to 25. They provide a range of free services such as counselling, volunteering, and mentoring, and started the Silence is Deadly campaign in partnership with the Canberra Raiders.“All Menslink services are free because we never want a financial consideration to get in the way of a young man receiving help,” says Martin. “And Allbids and the Canberra community are a big part of helping us provide those free services to young men and their families.“Allbids helps us reach audiences well beyond the capacity of Menslink. We’re a very small charity, but having this platform enables us to achieve much better results than what’s possible with our own resources.”Last year, Martin and his team received a big donation from The Canberra Raiders: dinner with Ricky Stuart and the Raiders’ leadership team. They auctioned it off on Allbids and a die-hard Raiders fan from Sydney was the winning bidder.“It was really nice,” says Martin. “He and five of his family and friends came down and had a wonderful experience. We couldn’t have come close to achieving the financial result nor the reach and exposure we have had with auctions like these without Allbids.”Snowy Hydro Southcare, Ginninderra Athletics Club, RSPCA ACT, Brumbies and many other local charities have also benefitted from Allbids’ help. Last November and December they helped raise over $200,000 though charity auctions.Rob says no charity or fundraising activity is too large or small. “Give us a call or send an email and we can find a way to help you sell your donations. And it doesn’t have to be elaborate or expensive products and services. We can pretty much sell anything – from gym memberships, artwork and books, to keynote speaker and photography sessions!”For more information, call Allbids on 6239 2262 or email admin@allbids.com.au.To view products Allbids are currently auctioning for charities, visit Allbids.com.au. The Canberra Raiders-Ronald McDonald House charity auction is now on! Visit to bid on your favourite jersey, but be fast because it ends this Friday (7th April).This article was first published on The Riot ACT Website by Rachel Ziv https://the-riotact.com/how-to-raise-funds-for-your-charity-or-community-organisation/199672

Deceased estates: What to do with all the assets and how to know what’s valuable


10/03/2017


The death of prominent Canberra architect Alastair Swayn made headlines last month, when it was revealed that the proceeds from the sale of the Estate would be given to his foundation, which supports young architects and designers.But what you may not know is that the Estate includes a collection of modernist assets which are being auctioned off on Allbids this month.Andrew Whitehead, a certified valuer who works with Allbids says, “Being an architect, Alastair had many items in his house that are functional but have a definite design pedigree. He obviously spent time choosing pieces that played exceptionally well with the space he lived in.The house in itself is a rare find, but it’s been fantastic to be able to leave the pieces in their natural state inside the home so bidders can view them the way Alastair displayed them. Anyone wanting to have a look can attend the open home, and each piece has a barcode which corresponds with the online Allbids listing. After the house sale we will have one special viewing right before the hammer goes down.”The auction includes a range of Italian designer furniture, Danish lighting, artwork, personal objects and even a collection of high end Italian silk ties. Everything is up for grabs, un-reserved, on Allbids until 7pm on the 30th March.Online auctioning has become a very popular avenue for handling the assets from a deceased estate.Rob Evans, CEO of Allbids says, “The process is really quite simple, and the return can be exceptional. At no cost, we send a valuer out to the house to go through the items, talk with you and give you an idea of what it should sell for. Where possible it’s always good to leave everything in the home during the auction, so people can view them in their natural state.We’ll catalogue each item, photograph it and then market it online for you. Because we are working on commission it’s always in our best interest to obtain the best possible price for the seller.”Andrew Whitehead, experienced valuer says, “Ethically, auctioning ticks a lot of boxes for Will executors. When you piecemeal a collection and sell it on classifieds sites, to a pawn broker or through a garage sale, you have a lot less chance of obtaining market value, which for beneficiaries should be quite important. Auctioning also makes it easy for anyone interested – family, friends, acquaintances – to see what is on offer.The other important point is that you don’t often know what’s valuable. I’ve reviewed many items that people think are valuable but aren’t, and then I find a piece in the back of a cupboard that’s worth a fortune. You just never know.”You just never know is something many people are familiar with, following the increasing popularity of TV shows such as Antiques Roadshow and Pawn Brokers.A month ago Allbids managed the sale of two local estates with a vast collection of Asian antiques. Andrew, who valued them, knew they were valuable but could never have anticipated the results that were achieved.“We put the collection on the website and advertised it locally, as well as overseas. Bidders came from everywhere, including New York and Singapore. We ended up selling a pair of antique Chinese ivory carvings for just over $30,000 and a Chinese scroll painting for $23,000.”Asian antiques have exploded in value in the past decade, with many wealthy Chinese wanting to spend their money buying back items of Chinese heritage sitting in Western collections.“We have a lot of highly educated people in Canberra, many with political or diplomatic backgrounds, and they have fascinating collections,” says Rob. “Often people head to Sydney auction houses because they think it’s a bigger market and therefore a better place to sell. However, the big city markets tend to be oversupplied.There are many collectors in Canberra with money to spend, and they are very happy to be able to find quality antiques and collectables locally. This means more money in the seller’s pocket, and a lot less hassle worrying about moving their assets interstate.”And Rob’s tips for getting the best price on your assets?“Start with a low price and let the market determine the worth. Auctioning online means people from all over the world can buy your assets. We do our part in making sure that all of our items are properly catalogued, so that when collectors search for what we’re selling, they find it. And often specialist collectors have their own understanding of how valuable something is going to be in the future, so they pay a much higher price than even we may anticipate.”Those in the process of handling a deceased estate are welcome to contact Allbids for a free valuation on 6239 2262 or visit Allbids.com.au.The Alastair Swayn auction runs until the end of the month.This article was first published on The Riot ACT Website by Rachel Ziv https://the-riotact.com/deceased-estates-what-to-do-with-all-the-assets-and-how-to-know-whats-valuable/196883

Architect's Passion


7/03/2017


AllBids are currently auctioning the entire house contents of the Late Alastair Swayn AO, the Inaugural ACT Government Architect.  Offered in-situ at his residence.The selection of works of art, designer furniture and lighting, and decorative and functional objects, reflects his life’s passion for art and design.  His vocational skills applied to his own domestic interior.Almost every object is of some pedigree in the design sense, carefully picked to suit the interior space.  The items form part of a coherent design theme, rather than just a collection per se.The residence is located at Urambi Village in Kambah.  This cluster of unique dwellings is also a design classic, listed on the Register of Nationally Significant 20th Century Architecture.  The townhouse is currently for sale through Amanda Mutton, Blue Property.The proceeds of the sale, as directed by his will, are being donated to the Alastair Swayn Foundation, a foundation he set up to support architecture students.

Our Latest Blog Posts

How do you downsize, or declutter, your home?
Whether you’re packing up to travel the world, or retiring into something more manageable, at some point in your life you will likely be faced with the need to downsize or declutter.The end result is nirvana – a clean and organised home housing only those belongings that you truly love. But the steps along the way can be both time consuming and frustrating, especially when you’re not sure what to do with all the “stuff”.So where do you start?Survey the scene and ask yourself:
  • How much space do I have to work with?
  • What do I absolutely need to keep?
  • What can I throw out?
  • What might family or friends want?
  • What can be sold?
The last question can be the most difficult to answer.Almost anything can be sold, but how much is it worth? If you list it for a price no one will pay, you could spend weeks staring at it wondering whether you need to drop the price.Even worse if it sells, and you find out it was worth 10x more.Listings on Gumtree and Facebook eliminate the valuable opportunity to pit buyers against each other – which ultimately helps you get a better price. And garage sales can be painstaking.There is one way to solve both problems: put it to auction. And if you can, get a professional valuer to give you an indication of its worth before you set the reserve.We asked online auction site Allbids (based in Fyswhick) about how the auction process works, and how they help Canberrans who are downsizing or decluttering.1. Free valuationTo start, Allbids provide a free valuation service, performed by expert valuers so you can get a true indication of the value of your art, antiques, furniture, collectables, jewellery, and so on.2. Photos and listingFollowing valuation, Allbids take professional photos of everything you want to sell, and create individual listings for each item. You can opt to have it all taken away (so buyers can pick up from Allbids), or sell items straight out of your home (which works well for estate sales).3. MarketingThe reserve is set, the items are listed, so it’s time to sell!150,000 people are registered to bid on Allbids, so you immediately gain access to a huge database of locals ready to buy.But the magic happens when their far-reaching platform helps someone in New York or Hong Kong who really wants what you’re selling, find it, bid on it, and have it delivered to their door.If you want to watch the process, you can see your listing any time, and even direct friends and family to check it out.4. Sale and pickupAllbids deal with the buyers, collect the funds and handle the pick-ups. They work on commission only, which ensures they only get paid once things get sold (and they obviously work hard to get you a good price!).And that’s it! Your extra “stuff” is gone, your house is nirvana, and you’re that little bit richer. (Or a lot richer, depending on what’s in your house!)So if you’re trying to downsize, or declutter, it may be worth considering an online auction.If you would like Allbids’ help deciding what can be sold, and what it’s worth, call 02 6239 2262 or visit ALLBIDS.This article was first published on The Riot ACT Website by Rachel Ziv https://the-riotact.com/how-do-you-downsize-or-declutter-your-home/202553

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5/05/2017
The Lobby: ideas for future use?
The Lobby is one of Canberra’s most iconic buildings, although on a lesser scale than the surrounding national institutions such the two Parliament Houses and the beautiful National Library of Australia. Located on national land, the National Capital Authority has responsibility for the building. Situated on King George Terrace, almost in the centre of the Parliamentary Triangle and overlooking the National Rose Garden, it is a building full of memories. Like many readers, I have been to weddings, book launches, poetry readings and memorable family get-togethers in the space. The Lobby was a restaurant and function centre for almost 50 years and was the choice of meeting place of political lobbyists with expense accounts, politicians, and senior Government officials, including the odd spook.After finally closing its doors at the beginning of the year, the future of the Lobby remains uncertain. The Lobby stopped functioning as an a la carte restaurant some years ago, although the elegant, glass-walled building had been a popular venue for weddings and functions. The attached Pork Barrel café and bakery in the kiosk part of the building attracted a day-time crowd and was well-patronised but ceased trading at the same time as The Lobby. The National Capital Authority was approached for an update about the future of the building but did not provide any information about possible future uses. I have seen references to the building being heritage-listed and if this is the case, the building should remain intact, but with an indeterminate function. The sale of all fixtures and fittings early this year means an easy transition was limited for any potential entrepreneurial local restauranteur willing to try something a bit different. Perhaps someone else, even from interstate, cashed-up from another enterprise, may tackle the space and create something that will become a go-to destination. Parking had been cited as a possible problem for the venue, but with paid parking in the Parliamentary Triangle, and the National Library car park barely 200 metres away, parking is mostly readily available. So unless the National Capital Authority can negotiate a restaurant lease, consideration should be given to repurposing the building.One idea discussed with interested parties could provide a possible solution to a long-standing issue. The ACT does not have a venue that could be described as a centre for indigenous culture for the traditional custodians and owners of the land. As The Lobby is on traditional land, surely there is room for at least a discussion that the land is returned to the traditional owners for cultural purposes. Its function could be a central repository for any collections of artefacts, or it could be easily converted into an art gallery for indigenous art, with a strong emphasis on local indigenous artists. The building is flooded with natural light and with a flexible track lighting system and moveable screens, the existing building could provide an excellent gallery space.For the time being, The Lobby sadly stands empty and just a little overgrown. At least it is not boarded up, nor the windows covered in newspaper. As we have no indication of the future of the building, it is interesting to pause and reflect on The Lobby’s past. Until 1988, it was the closest restaurant to the Australian Parliament, other than the House dining room. After Parliament moving up the hill in 1988, it inevitably became less frequented as it was no longer a quick dash across King George Terrace, and as new lobbyists and MPs came into Canberra perhaps found other restaurants more to their liking.The building was opened on 1 July 1968 by the then Federal Treasurer, a certain Mr McMahon. At the time, the Canberra Times commented it was ‘no mere hash house for coach parties’. It was anticipated it ‘would provide a sophisticated menu six nights a week’ and the décor had been ‘done by Lady (Marion) Hall Best’, interior decorator to the then rich and famous. The name was very appropriate as the restaurant was intended for lobbyists with expense accounts. The main diners were the politicians and bureaucrats who were being lobbied, although management did attempt to attract a local crowd when Parliament was not sitting. Sunday luncheons were offered as ‘a traditional Sunday dinner with ‘a grand 3-course luncheon of roast turkey or pork $3 (children $1-75), and Devonshire Tea served on Sunday afternoon’. By the end of 1969, there was a Dinner Dance each Friday night with music provided by the “Lobby Trio”.Apparently, service got off to a roaring start, and the owners were reputed to have covered all expenses within the first six weeks. A refreshment kiosk soon opened to meet the needs of tourists who were more interested in a pie and sauce. At the time of opening, there was little in the way of fine dining competition with most restaurants contained in dining rooms in motels, although I hope this statement unleashes a flurry of comments and memories of other restaurants of the era.So even though the future of The Lobby is still unknown, I wonder what personal views readers have about its future?Photos by Maryann MussaredThis article was first published on The Riot ACT Website by Maryann Mussared https://the-riotact.com/the-lobby-ideas-for-future-use/200075

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7/04/2017
How to raise funds for your charity or community organisation
Raising funds for a charity or community organisation can be hard work.It’s not that Canberrans aren’t generous. In fact, according to the latest NAB Charitable Giving Index, charity donations grew by 6.3% between 2015 and 2016. Residents in Deakin were crowned the most generous with an average donation of $258 per person, and O-Connor was named the most generous suburb by percentage of income.But people can only be generous when they know who you are and what your organisation stands for. And if your charity has no marketing budget, how do you get the word out and start raising money?According to Giving Australia, the answer may lie in your ability to embrace new technologies: “In response to the decreasing effectiveness of traditional approaches, many charities are investing in technologies making it easier to give through online or digital giving.”There are a number of ways to go about this (such as Crowdfunding websites), but often charity organisers find themselves as just another number in a line of hopeful not-for-profits hoping to raise money.One company determined to change this is local auction website Allbids. CEO Rob Evans and his team help charities turn product or service donations into cash via online auctions; completely commission-free.“Charity organisers often find that Canberra businesses are very generous when it comes to supporting local causes,” says Rob. “And while they may not be able to donate lots of money, they can donate goods and services which are as good as money once sold.”According to a Giving Australia study, Australian business gave $6.2 billion to charities between 2015 and 2016. 35% of that was through goods and services, rather than financial donations. All things considered, it seems to be a no-lose situation for all. The charity gets a valuable product or service voucher that can be auctioned off for money, and the business gets a tax write-off plus a valuable opportunity to position itself as a charitable organisation.Allbids have been helping charities turn product and service donations into cash for years. Rob says Allbids services enable a charity’s silent and live auctions as part of a community event or charity dinner to reach not only the people in the room, but their database of 150,000 buyers Australia wide.“We come out to the event and set up screens so people can see what they’re bidding on,” says Rob. “Then they can either bid online on phones or tablets, or via SMS until the hammer goes down.”This will be happening at the Karinya House Charity Gala Dinner on May 5, with the auction items available on Allbids for two weeks before the event, and the final hour of the auction live at the gala.One charity organiser who can’t speak highly enough of Allbids is Martin Fisk, CEO of Menslink.Menslink is a Canberra based charity which supports young men aged 12 to 25. They provide a range of free services such as counselling, volunteering, and mentoring, and started the Silence is Deadly campaign in partnership with the Canberra Raiders.“All Menslink services are free because we never want a financial consideration to get in the way of a young man receiving help,” says Martin. “And Allbids and the Canberra community are a big part of helping us provide those free services to young men and their families.“Allbids helps us reach audiences well beyond the capacity of Menslink. We’re a very small charity, but having this platform enables us to achieve much better results than what’s possible with our own resources.”Last year, Martin and his team received a big donation from The Canberra Raiders: dinner with Ricky Stuart and the Raiders’ leadership team. They auctioned it off on Allbids and a die-hard Raiders fan from Sydney was the winning bidder.“It was really nice,” says Martin. “He and five of his family and friends came down and had a wonderful experience. We couldn’t have come close to achieving the financial result nor the reach and exposure we have had with auctions like these without Allbids.”Snowy Hydro Southcare, Ginninderra Athletics Club, RSPCA ACT, Brumbies and many other local charities have also benefitted from Allbids’ help. Last November and December they helped raise over $200,000 though charity auctions.Rob says no charity or fundraising activity is too large or small. “Give us a call or send an email and we can find a way to help you sell your donations. And it doesn’t have to be elaborate or expensive products and services. We can pretty much sell anything – from gym memberships, artwork and books, to keynote speaker and photography sessions!”For more information, call Allbids on 6239 2262 or email admin@allbids.com.au.To view products Allbids are currently auctioning for charities, visit Allbids.com.au. The Canberra Raiders-Ronald McDonald House charity auction is now on! Visit to bid on your favourite jersey, but be fast because it ends this Friday (7th April).This article was first published on The Riot ACT Website by Rachel Ziv https://the-riotact.com/how-to-raise-funds-for-your-charity-or-community-organisation/199672

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4/04/2017
Deceased estates: What to do with all the assets and how to know what’s valuable
The death of prominent Canberra architect Alastair Swayn made headlines last month, when it was revealed that the proceeds from the sale of the Estate would be given to his foundation, which supports young architects and designers.But what you may not know is that the Estate includes a collection of modernist assets which are being auctioned off on Allbids this month.Andrew Whitehead, a certified valuer who works with Allbids says, “Being an architect, Alastair had many items in his house that are functional but have a definite design pedigree. He obviously spent time choosing pieces that played exceptionally well with the space he lived in.The house in itself is a rare find, but it’s been fantastic to be able to leave the pieces in their natural state inside the home so bidders can view them the way Alastair displayed them. Anyone wanting to have a look can attend the open home, and each piece has a barcode which corresponds with the online Allbids listing. After the house sale we will have one special viewing right before the hammer goes down.”The auction includes a range of Italian designer furniture, Danish lighting, artwork, personal objects and even a collection of high end Italian silk ties. Everything is up for grabs, un-reserved, on Allbids until 7pm on the 30th March.Online auctioning has become a very popular avenue for handling the assets from a deceased estate.Rob Evans, CEO of Allbids says, “The process is really quite simple, and the return can be exceptional. At no cost, we send a valuer out to the house to go through the items, talk with you and give you an idea of what it should sell for. Where possible it’s always good to leave everything in the home during the auction, so people can view them in their natural state.We’ll catalogue each item, photograph it and then market it online for you. Because we are working on commission it’s always in our best interest to obtain the best possible price for the seller.”Andrew Whitehead, experienced valuer says, “Ethically, auctioning ticks a lot of boxes for Will executors. When you piecemeal a collection and sell it on classifieds sites, to a pawn broker or through a garage sale, you have a lot less chance of obtaining market value, which for beneficiaries should be quite important. Auctioning also makes it easy for anyone interested – family, friends, acquaintances – to see what is on offer.The other important point is that you don’t often know what’s valuable. I’ve reviewed many items that people think are valuable but aren’t, and then I find a piece in the back of a cupboard that’s worth a fortune. You just never know.”You just never know is something many people are familiar with, following the increasing popularity of TV shows such as Antiques Roadshow and Pawn Brokers.A month ago Allbids managed the sale of two local estates with a vast collection of Asian antiques. Andrew, who valued them, knew they were valuable but could never have anticipated the results that were achieved.“We put the collection on the website and advertised it locally, as well as overseas. Bidders came from everywhere, including New York and Singapore. We ended up selling a pair of antique Chinese ivory carvings for just over $30,000 and a Chinese scroll painting for $23,000.”Asian antiques have exploded in value in the past decade, with many wealthy Chinese wanting to spend their money buying back items of Chinese heritage sitting in Western collections.“We have a lot of highly educated people in Canberra, many with political or diplomatic backgrounds, and they have fascinating collections,” says Rob. “Often people head to Sydney auction houses because they think it’s a bigger market and therefore a better place to sell. However, the big city markets tend to be oversupplied.There are many collectors in Canberra with money to spend, and they are very happy to be able to find quality antiques and collectables locally. This means more money in the seller’s pocket, and a lot less hassle worrying about moving their assets interstate.”And Rob’s tips for getting the best price on your assets?“Start with a low price and let the market determine the worth. Auctioning online means people from all over the world can buy your assets. We do our part in making sure that all of our items are properly catalogued, so that when collectors search for what we’re selling, they find it. And often specialist collectors have their own understanding of how valuable something is going to be in the future, so they pay a much higher price than even we may anticipate.”Those in the process of handling a deceased estate are welcome to contact Allbids for a free valuation on 6239 2262 or visit Allbids.com.au.The Alastair Swayn auction runs until the end of the month.This article was first published on The Riot ACT Website by Rachel Ziv https://the-riotact.com/deceased-estates-what-to-do-with-all-the-assets-and-how-to-know-whats-valuable/196883

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10/03/2017
Architect's Passion
AllBids are currently auctioning the entire house contents of the Late Alastair Swayn AO, the Inaugural ACT Government Architect.  Offered in-situ at his residence.The selection of works of art, designer furniture and lighting, and decorative and functional objects, reflects his life’s passion for art and design.  His vocational skills applied to his own domestic interior.Almost every object is of some pedigree in the design sense, carefully picked to suit the interior space.  The items form part of a coherent design theme, rather than just a collection per se.The residence is located at Urambi Village in Kambah.  This cluster of unique dwellings is also a design classic, listed on the Register of Nationally Significant 20th Century Architecture.  The townhouse is currently for sale through Amanda Mutton, Blue Property.The proceeds of the sale, as directed by his will, are being donated to the Alastair Swayn Foundation, a foundation he set up to support architecture students.

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7/03/2017
Carwoola Bush Fire Appeal - A Call to Support the Devastated Community
Bushfire turned into a raging inferno in Carwoola, east of Queanbeyan near Canberra on Friday 17th February 2017.  Just a few days after the devastating, out-of-control grassfire broke out in Carwoola and Captain’s Flat, east of Queanbeyan, the aftermath has come to light. Eleven homes have been lost, 12 more damaged in a fire and injuring countless wildlife which ripped through 3500 hectares of land at Carwoola.Queanbeyan-Palerang Regional Council has launched an appeal to help those affected by the grass fire. Council administrator Tim Overall said “This is heartbreaking for our community and, while we will never be able to replace what has been taken from these families, the establishment of the Carwoola Bushfire Appeal fund will allow the community to come together and support those who have been affected,” Mr. Overall said..Following the recent NRL trial game, the Raiders and Knights donated signed jerseys to Council which they are now auctioning via AllBids.com.au. All proceeds go to the Carwoola Bushfire Appeal. The auction closes Wednesday 8 March 2017. AllBids.com.au is proud to be a part of this Community fundraiser Bid here now and support the appeal.

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2/03/2017
Living the good life on the cheap (or even for free!)
New to Canberra? Setting up home and want to do it on the super cheap? Or maybe you just love tracking down a bargain? Check out Serina Huang’s recommendations for must-try sources of free and/or cheap goods so that you can live the good life in the nation’s capital without breaking the bank.THE FREE STUFFFreecycleThe Freecycle Network is a global phenomena and, founded in Tucson Arizona in 2003, one of the earliest platforms to encourage gifting. It is based on environmental principles, and Freecycle claims that its recycling initiatives ensures that over 500 tonnes a day of waste are kept out of landfill. There are over 9 million Freecyclers globally. There is one Freecycle group in Canberra with nearly 3,000 members.Buy Nothing ProjectI just LOVE the Buy Nothing Project. Does that sound overly effusive? Not to my way of thinking. I calculate that I have received thousands of dollars’ worth of items since joining the Buy Nothing Project. At a gifting event a few weeks ago I was the lucky recipient of items that would have cost me at least $578 if I had purchased them new. And two days later someone from the group dropped off a brand-new ski jacket that fitted perfectly. Guess what I am going to be wearing down the slopes this winter.But more than the items, what I really love about the Buy Nothing Project is the friendships that I have formed – it is aimed at community building. The Buy Nothing Project is a global phenomena that started on Bainbridge Island, Western Australia. It operates as a series of Facebook groups based on geographic locations. There are several in Canberra. I used to belong to the Northwestern Belconnen chapter before moving house. Once I moved I had to leave that particular group, but luckily I have been welcomed into a new group for the area where I now live.The other thing I really like about the Buy Nothing Project is that because the focus is on giving and receiving within a smaller community you don’t have to prove you are a worthy recipient. In other words, you don’t have to prove you are poor to put your hand up for an item. There are, I find, generally more people giving away than receiving. Or at least, in my own house moving and decluttering that has been my experience as I have been gifting like crazy. It is like a form of karma – when you give freely, what you need tends to come back. One of the most touching stories I have from the Buy Nothing Project was giving away a good quality framed print that no longer suited the room it was in. The lady who took is said she had been meaning to paint something similar for her sister before she died.  And then there was the dress my sister gave me that didn’t suit her, and didn’t suit me, either. But it did suit a Buy Nothing friend who proudly wore it to a job interview (and she looked fabulous in it).GumtreeYou have probably heard of Gumtree, and if you haven’t, where have you been? Gumtree is an Australian-founded classifieds ads site that is so well known and well used that it has almost replaced EBay (in Australia at least) as the place to go to for second hand goods. You can buy and sell almost anything on Gumtree. But it also provides an active platform for giving away things for free.I first found out about the free power of Gumtree when I was trying to gift a double bed mattress I no longer needed. I tried various ways of getting the word out until I tried Gumtree, marking the item ‘free’. It was gone in less than 48 hours to a grateful recipient. To search type in ‘free’ in the ‘I’m looking for’ search box – try it and you will be amazed what is available. You can also request items by placing a ‘wanted’ ad.All ClassifiedsThe classifieds section on All Classifieds works in a similar way to Gumtree. And yes, you can offer up and search for things that cost nothing. Select the ‘I’m Looking For’ window and watch what comes up. Sofa? Firewood? Lamp shades? Kitchen cabinets? Female rat? You would be surprised what people are willing – even desperate – to give away.Buy, sell, swap and giveaway groupsThere are numerous groups on Facebook that promote buying, selling, swapping and giving away. The largest in the ACT is the Canberra Buy, Sell, Swap & Giveaway Group, which has over 40,000 members. There are several other buy, sell and swap Facebook groups in the Canberra region including for fashion and children’s items.Access to the groups are usually restricted, so you will need to apply and be given access to the group by an administrator. Then you are free to look out for bargains or ask for what you want.  One of the features of Facebook groups like this is that you are often alerted when one of your Facebook friends posts an item. It can be interesting to observe – are they moving house? Or just decluttering?Canberra FreebiesThe Canberra Freebies Facebook group has over 12,000 members and is growing. This is a group ONLY for posting about things that are going for free. There is a separate Facebook group just for people to post about items that they want (Canberra Freebies Wanted Requests).Freebies is a popular term on Facebook and you can find all sorts of related freebies groups. But the Canberra Freebies is the biggest and most active in the nation’s capital.THE CHEAP STUFFIf you have a bit of cash to splash, you can pick up some amazing bargains when you know where to look.Allbids, Online Auctions AustraliaAllbids is an online auctions company headquartered in Fyshwick. Do you aspire to live like a diplomat? Then you could pick up items for sale from the US Embassy. If your aspirations are less grand, there are good bargains on household items, too, including whiteboards and furniture. The site has great bargains including from closing down businesses (the portal is selling items from the iconic Yarralumla Bakery – sad for many of the bakery’s regulars but great if you aspire to open a cafe or cater for a large crowd). It also has an extensive selection of tools and hardware items that would be a bargain for tradies or weekend DIY renovators.Auction Barn, 9 Wiluna Street, FyshwickA friend at work told me about this place. Actually he totally raved about this place. He almost totally furnished his house here, including antique and signature furniture, the most impressive being a cherry wood round table that formerly graced a residence of the US Embassy. He purchased the table for $500, but it had been imported from the US at a price many times greater than that.You can make a bid online, but my friend advises to go in person. “You might put in a small bid but on the day there will be other bidders who will trump your bid,” he said. “And there are other bargains as well. You really need to go and check it out.”My perusal of the website indicates there are indeed a lot of bargains, with everything from basic household items to the high end.Kippax Monster Garage Sale, Kippax Uniting Church, Cnr Luke St and Hardwick Cres, HoltSave the date – the  Kippax Monster Garage Sale is held three times a year, and the next one is on Saturday 4 March.Someone (a local) told me that the garage sale always does well because people in Belconnen are avid bargain hunters. Well I certainly was a huge bargain hunter and regular at this garage sale when I lived in West Belconnen so that generalization was true of me. I once even squeezed in a Kippax Monster Garage Sale forage just before boarding a flight for an international trip.  Priorities!  It was worth the rush.My best bargain so far has been an original $3 crockpot. Or maybe the set of six French aqua glass teacups that I purchased over ten years ago and still bring out when entertaining guests. I love how they catch the light when we sit outdoors.What to buy? Cheap furniture, which can be delivered same day for a small sum (often $20) to nearby locations. Prints and artwork – at least one art dealer lurks looking for, and finding, original works by famous artists.  Also electrical goods (I still regret not buying a Hello Kitty toaster), kitchenware, craft and haberdashery and clothes (usually $5 a bag).While there, stop to enjoy a plate of scones or two. They are baked throughout the day to ensure they are always warm and fresh out of the oven. Jean, who has been making them for over 20 years, received a Governor-General’s citation in December in celebration of her baking skills. When you taste her scones you will see why.Best tip is to get there early. Doors open at 8am, and there is always a large queue anxious to get in.Trash n’ Treasure, Jamison MarketsHaving operated for 42 years,the Rotary Club of Belconnen‘s Trash n’ Treasure markets are an institution. “Trash” has been an essential Sunday morning experience for many Canberrans. The event started out life as a car boot market, but now there is a community of regulars selling fresh fruit and produce, home grown items and bric a brac.Money raised from Trash n’ Treasure goes to support the work of the Rotary Club of Belconnen in the community; more than $5 million has been raised since Trash started in 1974. The Rotarians show dedication and commitment in doing what they do even in the depth of winter – you will find a hardy group of volunteers there at 5.30am in cold and dark setting up before the stallholders get there. My ex-husband was, and still is, a member of this club so I know firsthand how much effort goes into Trash.Beyond the money raised for charitable works, Trash plays an important role within the community – especially with those who are struggling financially. Good friends once told me that they migrated to Canberra with very little and money was tight. Having come from Singapore, they were unprepared for the cold reality of winter. “We went to Trash n’ Treasure and I was able to buy warm clothes for my children. I was so happy I cried,” my friend told me.The Green Shed, MitchellThe Green Shed makes going to the tip cool. On a recent tip trip, I was appalled how much STILL gets thrown out, despite the recycling efforts of The Green Shed. Inside the shed you can find sad rows of unwanted items that people just throw out – rows and rows of bikes, prams, books, clothes, plates, bowls – you name it. But there is also a sense of optimism that many of the items will eventually find a loved home before being tossed for good. Items are for sale, but very cheap.  And out the front there are skip bins full of clothes that are FREE.Do you have a favourite source of cheap or free goods in and around Canberra? Let us know in the comments.This article was first published on The Riot ACT Website by Serina Bird Huang https://the-riotact.com/free-free-and-very-cheap/195631

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26/02/2017
Charity Auction in aid of Sam Willoughby - The BMX Bandit
Let us tell you about Sam Willoughby. Sam Willoughby is a game-changer in the world of BMX racing. Since bursting onto the scene winning back to back Junior Elite World Titles in 2008 and 2009, Sam has won just about every title imaginable. Alongside his unmatched pro winning streak in USA BMX history, he has won 3 overall USA BMX National #1 Pro titles, multiple Elite Men World Titles, multiple Australian National Titles and is a 2x Olympian with a Silver Medal performance during the 2012 London Olympic Games.
                                   
On Sept 10, 2016, Sam had a training accident on the local Chula Vista BMX track where he was airlifted to the hospital and operated on that evening due to sustaining fractures in his C6 and C7 vertebrae which severely compressed his spinal cord and left him with no movement below his chest. The operation involved removing his C6 vertebrae, replacing it with a titanium cage, and fusing his C5-C7 vertebrae with a plate and 4 screws. Fortunately, this surgery was successful enough at decompressing his spinal cord and aligning his vertebrae that no second operation for further stabilization was necessary. However, trauma to the spinal cord at this extent is not an overnight recovery and leaves us with an extremely unknown prognosis. At this stage, Sam has regained use of his arms and is slowly regaining slight sensations in his legs. The recovery process is a long and ongoing challenge for Sam, and as such any support that can be offered by the broader community is greatly appreciated.Currently on auction at ALLBIDS, we have a Clipsal 500 experience for two. All proceeds will go to Sam. The experience includes:2 x 2017 4 –day Barry Sheene Pit Straight Grandstand Tickets2017Value: $330 per ticket March 2-51 x 2017 Clipsal 500 Adelaide Supercars Hot LapValue: ‘Money Can’t Buy’Friday 3 March 2017 between 4:30pm & 6pm. Exact time to be confirmed with winner closer to the event

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24/02/2017
ALLBIDS to bring the hammer down on the Mate 9 Porsche
Huawei to auction a limited edition Mate 9 Porsche for Tour de Cure Charity.To celebrate the release of the Huawei Mate 9 this week, Huawei are auctioning one of a very limited number of Mate 9 Porsche Smartphones on ALLBIDS.com.au. The auction will run from Wednesday 8 February until midday Friday 10 February 2017. The winner will be announced at World Square on Friday February 10th at 1230pm. The proceeds from the auction will go to the charity Tour de Cure.Tour de Cure is a tier 1 cancer charity that has raised more than $25m since 2007. They have funded over 250 cancer research, support and prevention projects that, in turn, have seen 18 scientifically recognized cancer breakthroughs. Huawei have been a long term partner of Tour de Cure since 2011 and all the proceeds from the Porsche Design Mate 9 Charity Auction will be donated to Tour de Cure.The Porsche Design Huawei Mate 9 is a limited edition Smartphone that combines Porsche Design’s signature brand aesthetic with Huawei’s mobile engineering expertise, giving high-demanding individuals unprecedented luxury and performance in the palm of their hand.“This phone is the hottest mobile phone in Australia – it will be one of a kind and anyone who already has a Porsche or wants to own one would love have it – besides bidding on the ALLBIDS site is really great fun and you’ll be supporting a great cause” Jordan Rapana, Canberra Raiders.“The Mate 9 Porsche is not available for sale in Australia. We are proud to be auctioning one of only three devices that Huawei currently have in the country.” Rob Evans, CEO ALLBIDS “With over 100,000 registered users nationally we are excited to support the auction and see which state the phone will end up in. To bid on the Mate 9 Porsche Smartphone, simply visithttps://www.allbids.com.au/auctions/817761/porsche-design-huawei-mate-9-limited-edition-smartphone-to-support-tour-de-cure

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8/02/2017
Yarralumla Bakery to close leaving ten jobless
Rising rents mean Yarralumla’s bakery is set to close after 33 years in business on February 18, with fittings to be sold on Allbids.com and several staff, including one who had worked for the family-run operation for 20 years, left jobless.The owner, baker and pastry chef Greg Hoitink, will continue to operate Pastries on Perry, his other bakery at Chapman, but everyone else who works in the Yarralumla business, ten staff in total, will be out of a job later this month as a result of the closure.In a post on Facebook, the bakery thanked customers and staff past and present for their support over 33 years and announced the closure, attributing it to “the landlord asking for unrealistic rents”.

The soon-to-be unemployed include manager Scott Gorham, who has worked there for three years alongside another full-time staff member, Barbara Brooker, who has provided two decades of service to the business since joining the team as a schoolgirl.“She’s a barista and sandwich hand,” Mr Gorham said of the stalwart Ms Brooker. “Like all of us, she’s an all-rounder … in a small business, everyone’s got to do everything.”On the baking side, an apprentice and a kitchen hand will lose their jobs, adding to number of baking specialists out of work in Canberra following the sudden closure of Braddon bakery and cafe Autolyse last month.The Yarralumla Bakery’s last trading day will be February 18, and the store has to be empty by the end of the month.Equipment currently on site is being auctioned on Allbids.com.Asked whether the staff would be looking for similar work in food preparation and service, Mr Gorham said, “I think everyone’s looking for anything now.”The team RiotACT met at the bakery today spoke highly of Mr Hoitink, who had told them of the impending closure last Wednesday.“He’s had negotiations with the landlord for the last three years, and can’t come to any agreement,” Mr Gorham said.Business had been steady, though the bakery manager noted that there had been an impact from two new cafes in the Yarralumla shopping precinct as well as coffee shops at nearby Deakin shops and at the Equinox building in Deakin West.The family-run business had operated on the site for 33 years.“The father owned it before this and then the two brothers have had it, now Greg’s here on his own,” Mr Gorham said.The popularity of the Turkish Pide House next door had been a positive for the bakery.“It’s a good drawcard … both feed off one another,” the manager said, agreeing that it was a good position for a business “so long as they can afford the rent”.“It just keeps going up, year after year after year,” he said.Yarralumla Bakery staff will remain at work until February 18. The bakery is at 49 Novar St, Yarralumla and the phone number is (02) 6282 3371.Pictured are Barbara Brooker, who has worked at the bakery for two decades, and manager Scott Gorham. The pair are among several staff looking for work as a result of the impending closure. Photo: Charlotte HarperThis article was first published on The Riot ACT Website by Charlotte Harper https://the-riotact.com/yarralumla-bakery-to-close-leaving-ten-jobless/194481


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7/02/2017

New to ALLBIDS? Watch this video!

See why you will come to ALLBIDS! Our online Auction allows you to trade simply and with great value fees. Register today and start trading.

 
 

Our success stories / testimonials OR don't take our word for it...

Menslink
Menslink

Allbids provide an outstanding service to charities like Menslink in a number of ways.

Firstly, Allbids helps us reach audiences well beyond the capacity of Menslink. We’re a very small charity, but having their online platform enables us to achieve much better results than what’s possible with our own resources. At our last auction - which raised over $100,000 for us - we had bidders from all around Australia bid on our items - Allbids managed the payments and collection for us without any issues.

Secondly, Allbids staff were on hand during our Big Night Out to manage the whole process - setting out the displays, helping guests at tables bid for silent auction, managing payments - they couldn't have been more helpful.

Finally, Allbids are always available for the items that we might get to auction from time to time - nothing is too much trouble for them.

Their support for Menslink - and other charities - over the years has been fantastic. They've helped promote our work to their clients, helped us raise far more money from auction items than we could have alone or on other platforms and have been a delight to work with. I could not recommend them more highly and hope to continue the partnership for many years to come

Martin Fisk

Karinya House
Karinya House

I am writing to extend our sincere appreciation to ALLBids for their recent support of our 2017 Karinya House Annual Mother’s Day Gala Dinner, held on 5 May 2016. We especially thank Jo, Louise and the ALLBIDS staff who assisted with the online auction pages for Karinya House. The support also provided by Jo, Louise and the team at the event itself and post the event to finalise the auction was also outstanding and so greatly appreciated.

Karinya House for Mothers and Babies is a community based, not for profit organisation serving the ACT and surrounding regions. In its twentieth year of operation, Karinya provides supported accommodation and outreach services to pregnant and parenting women in crises and their children. In August 2016 Karinya, with specialist funding for construction from the ACT Government, opened its new Home and transitioned to our purpose-built facility, doubling residential capacity, and creating a designated area for specialised outreach and group services. This new facility, whilst significantly enhancing service delivery, has also increased our annual operating budget.

This is the first year we have had the availability of an Online Auction House to support the Gala Dinner. The Gala Dinner is our premier fundraising event, and it is vital to us that the event generates as much financial support as possible. We were unaware prior to be contacting by Louise, that ALLBIDS offered the Online Auction service to Not for Profit Organisations entirely free of any sales commissions or other fees and charges. We were somewhat apprehensive, as is the case with something new and untried at times, but Louise and Jo, at our first meeting were completely assured that the ALLBIDS service would be fantastic and easy. They, and the ALLBIDS processes and outcomes, did not disappoint. And the whole ALLBIDS experience and result far exceeded our expectations!

As a community based organisation, it is important to note, that we generate around half of our operating revenue each year through financial donations and sponsorships from Corporates, Philanthropic Trusts & Foundations, local businesses, individuals and families. In addition we are supported through pro bono professional services as well as in kind material donations.

The support of ALLBIDS through their Charity & Community Auctions service is an outstanding and innovative form of community engagement. ALLBIDS are to be congratulated on providing this wonderful service and supporting community service organisations such as Karinya House. I am pleased to confirm that for Karinya House, the addition of ALLBIDS as part of our Gala Dinner Event and Team (sorry we are claiming your team as part of our team now!) made a significant difference to the fundraising proceeds from the auction component of our Gala Dinner. Proceeds from the Auction were 73% higher than the prior year’s Gala Dinner. This is outstanding, and it certainly gives us impetus to source a greater number of donations for next year’s Gala Dinner Auctions.

We are very thankful to have ALLBIDS as part of our Karinya family. We do hope this partnership will be one we can rely on for future events. Please extend our thanks to the ALLBIDS Board, Executive and Staff Team for the support provided for the 2017 Gala Dinner. I commend ALLBIDS for their demonstrated professional competence, experience, and dedication, as well as their generosity and example in corporate citizenship and care for some of the most vulnerable women and children in our community.

Jo Saccasan

Australian Customs and Border Protection
Australian Customs and Border Protection

ALLBIDS has had an ongoing 2 year contract partnership with Australian Customs regarding removal and disposal of The Department’s redundant IT assets nationally.

The main type of assets being disposed of are: servers, networking equipment, Department specific equipment (eg. Passport scanners) as well as generic IT such as PCs Notebooks and Monitors.

Over this period of time, ALLBIDS has facilitated the removal and disposal of IT assets from secure working environments in Canberra, Sydney, Brisbane, Melbourne, Adelaide & Perth.

We also has organised and facilitated regional and remote pickups and disposals of IT equipment from areas such as Townsville, Cairns and even offshore on Thursday Island.

ALLBIDS has also followed all security protocols for The Department in regards to removal and disposal of the IT assets.

Matthew Smith

Department of Parliamentary Services
Department of Parliamentary Services

ALLBIDS had facilitated all IT disposals for The Department over the past 5-6 years. The majority if these disposals have been from The Department here in Canberra consisting of generic IT and Department-specific assets such as servers, audio visual networking equipment & other networking assets. ALLBIDS has disposed of all redundant and refreshed IT equipment over this period and tailored asset tracking and Management Reports back to the Department in a format that integrates back into their reporting mechanism. ALLBIDS has also been fully compliant with all collection and disposal protocols in regards to asset disposal from secure working environments.

Wayne Evans

IP Australia
IP Australia

ALLBIDS has an ongoing disposal agreement in place with IP Australia since 2007. Over this time ALLBIDS had facilitated the disposal of the Department’s IT assets primarily in Canberra but from several locations around Australia including Melbourne, Sydney, Perth and Adelaide. The main asset types being disposed of have been generic IT assets (PCs, notebooks, monitors) as well as networking gear including Servers, networking switches, audio/visual equipment and other general IT assets. We have tailored reporting back to The Department to track IT asset management in a format that they can easily integrate back into their systems to close and reconcile the asset management.

Wayne O'Brien

Australian Bureau of Statistics
Australian Bureau of Statistics

Allbids has an exclusive ongoing disposal contract in place with The Department for IT disposals over the past 3-4 years from their central location here in Canberra as well as multiple sites around Australia. This Department one of our larger disposal contracts for the disposal of IT equipment and regularly dispose and manage redundant IT equipment such as generic IT (PCs, notebooks, monitors) as well as large quantities of networking equipment (servers, switches, storage arrays) and other Department-specific IT assets. Allbids regularly facilitates and organises IT disposal from Canberra, Melbourne, Sydney, Brisbane, Adelaide & Perth as well as more remote sites such as Tasmania, Northern Territory and regional areas. Allbids also tailors our asset tracking and reporting back to the Department in a format that integrates back into their asset disposal and management systems. Allbids has facilitated not just the IT asset disposal but also the collection and freight logistics required at a national level to maximise returns back to the Department.

David Shaw

Car Purchase
Car Purchase

I bought my son a ford laser on here and although it was older (1991) I didn't expect much for our $1200 spent ! Especially considering it had 12months rego. I couldn't have had a more pleasant surprise ! It's a pearler and we found out later my folks new the owner and he was a mechanic who lived opposite them and he nurtured it. It had service books up to date and it runs so so well, uses no oil or water and has brand new tyres ! It's a 1.8 ghia too . The paint is great and the interior is as new . Needless to say my son loves it and has already fitted some nice alloy wheels and a kick ass stereo. The car is Worth twice what we paid for it at retail Level ! All bids rock. Thanks !!!! This is a true testimonial by a real customer !!! I'm not the type to do this either BUT was just so impressed.

Rotorboy68

No hesitation recommending ALLBIDS service
No hesitation recommending ALLBIDS service

I approached Allbids to assist me to liquidate the plant and equipment owned by one of my clients. The client owned and operated a quarry on the outskirts of Canberra

Following an illness the client needed to completely restructure their business, which resulted in client selling off all the business assets

Due to the size and scale of the operation all the equipment was sold from the existing location. This saved the client valuable time and money by not having to pay removal costs and freight.

Allbids took complete control of the whole operation and used their extensive database to access buyers. The complete process was seamless with Allbids managing all inspections, enquiries, delivery and logistics whilst providing me with a complete audit trail for each asset sold.

I have no hesitation in recommending the services of Allbids. They turned the surplus assets of our client into cash.

ROCKS

Recent car purchase
Recent car purchase

I bought an excellent Subaru L1800 wagon via Allbids' auction site, and I want to report back that the car was in excellent condition, as described. The photos were accurate and showed what I needed to see as a potential buyer.  We were able to inspect the car on location, including starting it and letting it run, and testing the clutch and brakes.

The staff were friendly and helpful. For me, this was a really good experience all around, and I recommend Allbids unreservedly to potential bidders.

kobold

Allbids is a brilliant website/service
Allbids is a brilliant website/service

I would like to say that Allbids is a brilliant website/service.  For our family it serves as a valuable resource in locating goods we need to buy, as well as purchasing some great bargains.  It has been a fantastic way for me to make some extra cash by selling unwanted goods that we no longer use.

itsdone

Furnished with items purchased from Allbids
Furnished with items purchased from Allbids

We are building a house and also renovating two existing cottages on a rural property. We have found Allbids to be an excellent source of materials for the renovation job - the cottages will be largely furnished with items purchased from Allbids, and we are using recycled building materials and tools - many of which are also from Allbids.

It will be 12 months before the projects are finished but I will send you photos when complete - might be useful as an example of what can be achieved with the services of Allbids. Thanks again

heather46

Spreading the word to every one
Spreading the word to every one

I just wanted to tell you what a wonderful job Allbids is doing and that I am still spreading the word to every one I know! Allbids is providing a service that has been needed for a while and it seems to be getting better all the time!

Again Thanks a Million

farmergirl