About ALLBIDS - Online Auctions based in Canberra

We believe the most effective form of recycling is returning used goods and assets to the community. This is ALLBIDS primary focus. When not possible ALLBIDS disposes of these obsolete goods or hazardous wastes through accredited recycling solutions.

ALLBIDS offers online auctions every day!

  Secure online auction platform & payment system

  Awesome bargains every day on brand new, ex-lease and pre-owned goods

  Best price for both buyers and sellers

  Transparent online auction process

  Full & accurate description and photos of items

Liquidated, surplus stock or unwanted assets?

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02 6239 2262

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Our History

ALLBIDS was established in 2002 selling Government surplus by traditional Auctions in Canberra. We established an online presence in 2004 and our database and website have expanded to our current site which services over 500 vendors and sells over 100,000 assets every year.

ALLBIDS.com.au Pty Ltd | ABN: 26 101 308 105 | 7 Wiluna Street, Fyshwick, ACT 2609 Australia

Our Latest News

Garage sales in Canberra: Pain or profit?
 Canberrans love a good garage sale, and every weekend our back streets are adorned with signs directing us to go this way or that in the hope of snagging a great bargain, or finding something we know has been seriously undervalued.But from the owner’s point of view, is all the trouble really worth it? Getting everything together, setting it all up in the early hours of the morning, pricing, manning the stands all day, haggling with bargain hunters…and all the while wondering if you’ve accidentally missed something that’s surprisingly worth a fortune.DIY second-hand selling has become very popular, facilitated by online marketplaces that have made it easier than ever to advertise. But Rob Evans, CEO of Allbids, says that recent sales on the site suggest people are keen to explore “Garage Sales 2.0” where technology is leveraged to conduct the garage sale via an online auction, omitting the need for haggling and allowing the goods to be sold anytime.“It’s become very popular,” says Rob. “Because we not only get the 100 or so bargain hunters who follow the Canberra garage sale trail every week, but the prices are driven up by our 150,000 general registered bidders from Allbids and Allclassifieds, some of whom are interstate and happy to travel if they find something they like.”Rob says that the main attraction though is getting a prior appraisal so people understand what their items are really worth. He recounts a recent experience where a client was about to have a garage sale, but decided to get an appraisal first.“The valuer went out to see them, to give a rough idea of what everything was worth. The owners were reasonably accurate with most things, until he got to a big mahogany chest. The chest itself was only worth a few hundred dollars, but inside he found a little antique. The owners were going to throw it out or give it away for free, but it was actually worth over $2,500!“At a traditional garage sale, anyone who knew that would never tell you. And if you price it at what it’s worth, you’ll often find that no one wants to buy it. It takes a collection of buyers, who all understand the worth, bidding against each other to net you the best profit. And you never really know what you’ve got until you get a professional to look at it for you.”Allbids also recently had a client from Florey drop in a few cardboard boxes, packed with old knick knacks from around his house. He thought it was all junk and was about to throw it out, but wanted a professional to take a look.“It was all pretty rudimentary,” says Rob. “Until we got to an old Omega Seamaster watch. It wasn’t in great condition, but still fetched $1,500 at auction.”For more information about conducting your garage sale via online auction, or getting a free in-home appraisal on your second-hand goods, visit Allbids or call 6239 2262.What’s your experience with garage sales? Have they been painful or profitable?This article was first published on The Riot ACT Website by Rachel Ziv https://the-riotact.com/garage-sales-in-canberra-pain-or-profit/210011

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21/07/2017
Feeling a little low? You might have Seasonal Affective Disorder
 Winter is definitely upon us and if you’ve been feeling a little down or lacking in motivation, it could be a result of the dark and dreary Canberra weather. According to research, cold weather and limited sunlight can actually have a negative impact on the way our brains process emotions and bodily sensations.According to Dr. Lewis from the University of Canberra, Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD) is a type of depression that commonly occurs with the change in season, usually winter.“SAD can be brought on by a reduction in exposure to sunlight and a change in the weather,” Dr. Lewis explains. “During winter, we experience more grey skies, sub-zero temperatures as well as shorter and darker days.”In an effort to perk up Canberrans (and support a very worthy charity in the process), Allbids have just announced that they will be running a series of Escape the Winter Blues accommodation auctions. Auctions will be held each week, and will offer the opportunity to grab a bargain rate for accommodation in a sunny, warm holiday destination such as Fiji or Vanuatu.Proceeds from the auctions will be donated to the Domestic Violence Crisis Service (DVCS) 2017 Support Group Program.“Domestic violence is a serious issue, DVCS have some great programs to assist those in need and we are proud to offer our support,” says Rob Evans, CEO of Allbids.“DVCS do a fantastic job providing support to women, men and children affected by violence and abuse, and this is one way we can contribute to the meaningful work they do and help counter this devastating problem, which can have far-reaching effects on our community.”The DVCS 2017 Support Group Program offers free groups to help people of all ages (and genders) cope with domestic violence.The groups are led by facilitators with extensive experience in domestic violence and group facilitation and are free of charge.For more information about DVCS and their programs, visit DVCS or call them on 6280 6999.To support DVCS via an Allbids Escape the Winter Blues accommodation auction, visit Allbids and click on the link in the banner.This article was first published on The Riot ACT Website  https://the-riotact.com/feeling-a-little-low-you-might-have-seasonal-affective-disorder/209336

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8/07/2017
Whatever happened to allclassifieds?
 Since 2001, allclassifieds has been Canberra’s favourite classifieds websites, offering a simple platform for locals to buy and sell just about anything. Last year we reported that allclassifieds had been acquired by local online auction powerhouse allbids.So where are they now?Well, if you’ve been to allclassifieds lately, you would have seen that the site is alive and well – albeit sporting a very different look and feel to coincide with the allbids sales platform.The most notable changes include:
  • The change in branding
  • A buyer’s search now produces results from both allclassifieds and allbids listings
  • Sellers are now selling to buyers from both databases
  • Sellers must verify their identity before creating a listing
Rob Evans, CEO of allbids, explains how it all works.“It’s been a journey but allclassifieds has now been fully integrated into allbids, and the two sites really complement each other.“Allclassifieds is still the place to go to find a bargain or sell items you no longer want or need. But now everything is streamlined, so when you search for a product you get instant access to every allclassifieds listing plus every allbids listing (which includes a huge array of Government/AFP and business surplus stock available via online auction). For buyers it means more choice. For sellers it means reaching the traditional allclassifieds market, and our 150,000 registered allbids users.“With the amount of traffic between the two sites now amalgamated, it’s exciting times. The product range is massive – new and second-hand art, jewellery, electronics, manchester, wine, clothing, toys, sports memorabilia and more. There’s also a huge range of second-hand cars from private sellers, as well as for online auction on behalf of car dealers in Canberra.”In terms of functionality, Rob says that the extra verification process that sellers need to undergo was essential to maintain the high standards of security allbids requires.“We were aware of the many spam issues plaguing online marketplaces – both from a buying and selling perspective. So we had a security expert advise us on the best way to move forward, which resulted in the new seller verification process requiring you to enter your driver’s license number before you can list an item. It takes two seconds, but it’s an essential step to protect all of our users.”Rob has big plans for the site and says the allbids team are focussed on continual improvement in terms of functionality and aesthetics.“We are now Canberra’s biggest database of buyers/bargains/sellers and fundraising, and we take that very seriously.“The allbids database grows steadily every year, but with the addition of the classifieds section and amalgamating the allclassifieds database, it’s growing rapidly.“We’re always seeking ways to make things bigger and better for our buyers and sellers, and to make it easy for people to find a bargain or make money from selling their goods.”To check out the new-look allclassifieds website, head to Allbids.This article was first published on The Riot ACT Website by Rachel Ziv https://the-riotact.com/whatever-happened-to-allclassifieds/206179

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13/06/2017
Should you buy or sell a car online?
 When Stacey Green* decided to sell her beautiful 2002 Jeep Cherokee, she thought that the fastest and easiest way would be via an online listing.She turned to an online marketplace, put in all the details, set it to live and waited.And waited. And waited.After one month and no enquiries, she came to the realisation that perhaps the price was too high. So she dropped it by $1,000.And waited. And waited.After a second month of no enquiries, she again thought that the price was too high, and dropped it by another $1,000. But she also realised that the particular online marketplace she had chosen to list with was probably part of the problem. So Stacey listed the car on a second online marketplace at the new reduced price.Within 10 minutes, the phone began to ring. And ring. It rang 6 times in two hours, and before long Stacey had a stream of interested buyers lined up to inspect the car.The first couple to see it were very keen. Naturally they asked to test drive it, so Stacey handed over the keys and waved to them as they reversed out of her driveway…right into her neighbour’s car.They were very apologetic, and though the Jeep had only a minor scratch (as Jeeps do), the neighbour’s car wasn’t so lucky. The test drivers immediately offered to pay the insurance excess, and said they wanted to buy the car no matter what.At the end of the day, Stacey got what she wanted – the Jeep sold. But overall it was an exhausting experience. And she was disappointed because she couldn’t help but think that she would have got a lot more money if she’d listed on the second online marketplace first, at the original price.Online buyers’ marketplaces make it easy to list items such as second-hand cars. But unfortunately, they don’t take away the stress of wondering:
  • Is this the right online marketplace to sell the car?
  • Will it reach the right buyers?
  • How do I price it?
  • Am I prepared to haggle?
  • Not to mention worrying about the test drives!And when it comes to pricing, a seller is typically stuck between two scenarios: they place the ad and get no response (price too high) or they get an immediate response and sell straight away (price too low).But there is another way to buy and sell a car online that Stacey admits she didn’t even know about. And in hindsight, she says it would have helped her get everything she wanted, while avoiding all the stress.She could have done an online auction.Local auction websites, such as Allbids, sell second-hand cars on behalf of private individuals and car dealers every day. And the way it works means you never have to:
    • Field calls
    • Have people come to your home for inspections
    • Worry about test drives
    • Stress over the price you set
    • Haggle with buyers
    In Allbids’ case, they take all the photos, store the car for you (so people can go and see it), create the listing, market it to over 150,000 registered buyers, and receive the payment (which they then pay to you, less a small commission).The listing runs for 7 days to give buyers enough time to compete over the price. A sale is guaranteed, and sellers often find the price exceeds expectations because anyone who sees a great bargain is motivated to bid, which drives the price up until the end. With two motivated buyers, the sky’s the limit!From the buyer’s perspective, online auction sites can be a great way to find a second-hand car for less than $10,000. Car dealers aren’t all that interested in selling cars for less than 10k, so they give them to Allbids to sell at whatever price the market is willing to pay.For mums and dads helping their teenager buy a first car, a family wanting a second run-around car, or a student looking for a good deal, online auctions make it easy to find a quality car at an affordable price.Rob Evans, CEO of Allbids says, “We have car dealers from all over the ACT and Southern NSW giving us quality cars to put to auction, plus private sellers too. Most people hate the hassle of managing a listing, worrying about the price they set, and then haggling over a few hundred dollars.“There’s one week between when a car is listed and the online hammer goes down, to give buyers plenty of time to ring a mechanic and have them do a Buyers’ Inspection. And unlike an online marketplace where you hope the seller is being truthful, Allbids have a duty of care to list all the faults with the car so you can see straight away if it’s not something you’re prepared to live with.“It’s a seamless experience, and with 150,000 buyers on our database we always find a home for a second-hand car by the time the online hammer goes down.”Visit Allbids to see their current second-hand cars for auction, or to learn more about buying or selling a car via online auction, call Allbids on 02 6239 2262.Have you ever tried to buy or sell a car online? What was your experience?This article was first published on The Riot ACT Website by Rachel Ziv https://the-riotact.com/should-you-buy-or-sell-a-car-online/203279

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    19/05/2017
    What to look for when buying a car
    As far as first car horror stories go, mine is a cracker.It was a long time before I could even look back with enough fondness to give her a nickname. And even then, the nickname of choice was ‘The Hyundai Deathtrap’.No offence to Hyundai, of course. It was the individual car – rather than the brand – that was the problem here. Or more specifically, the dodgy dealer.Bought from one of the (then) larger and seemingly well-established yards on Newcastle Street in Fyshwick, she was a well-priced 1991 Excel hatchback. I congratulated myself on making such a sensible choice.Much younger and more naïve then, I didn’t notice the paint colour inside the engine bay was different to the exterior. Weird.Or that the blueish-white smoke coming from the exhaust might not just be ‘due to the cold weather’ like I was told.Yes, yes, I know – did I mention I was young and naïve?Proud new car owner that I was, I kitted her out with every gaudy accessory I could find – including furry black-and-white faux cowhide seat covers, chrome foot pedals and a neon purple gearstick knob.Super understated, and a total blast for all of the three months she lasted before falling to pieces.(The story does have a happy ending. It took me seven years and countless court appearances, but I did finally get my money back. With interest. Never did get back my dignity after driving around with those seat covers though …)In the hope I might spare others such an unpleasant experience, I’ve thrown together a few tips on buying your first, or next, car.New or used?This is the first decision, which will guide your choice of car; and there are pros and cons either way.Used cars are a slightly-less-terrible investment and much cheaper. But they come with existing wear or damage, as well as the risk that you’re buying someone else mistakes and poor quality of care.New cars are inevitably safe and reliable but are of course, more expensive. And as the cliché goes, you’ll lose most of that money the moment you drive off the lot.My advice is to shoot for a late model used car. The first thing you should check is the odometer – everything else aside, fewer kilometres means less wear and tear, and less likelihood a few important parts are about to hit the end of their useful life.Check the service records – these are non-negotiable, in my humble opinion. No service records, no purchase.Look closely at the condition of the car, especially around the edges – for example, worn on the carpet, scuffing around the doors, handles and locks, even a recently cleaned engine bay. A good detail will hide a lot of sins, but you can find signs that a car has generally been well cared for, or not. Someone who doesn’t care about the car’s appearance might also not care about its mechanics.Private, auction or dealership?If you choose to buy your car from a dealership, you’ll likely pay a little more than if buying from a private seller. However, you will get extra protections under the Sale of Motor Vehicles Act 1977, which include things like a three-business-day cooling-off period, guaranteed title over the car, and often some warranty provisions.(Incidentally, this warranty was what enabled me to take successful action against the dealer that sold me the Deathtrap).Note however, the list of items not covered by warranty is extensive, and could still provide quite a hit to the hip pocket:Things not covered by the warranty include tyres, batteries, perishable items such as brake pads and wiper blades, accessories fitted after manufacture such as stereo systems, damage caused by accidents, misuse or negligence after delivery, damage to paintwork or upholstery after delivery, tune-ups or services and tools. (From Access Canberra)If you buy a car privately, you’re still protected by our basic consumer laws, but the burden is on you to do a few more checks, and you’ll likely have to do a lot more work to chase up any problems. Fair Trading exists to keep businesses in line, but when it comes to private sellers, you’re kinda on your own.There are a number of questions you must ask, and checks you should complete – I won’t re-write them here because there’s heaps of helpful advice and a great checklist here.We’re lucky to have access to a few good auction options in Canberra – Pickles and AllBids among them, and you can pick up a great ex-govt fleet car for a song. It’ll likely have higher mileage so be wary of that, but it should’ve been generally well cared for and serviced.Buying at an auction might feel more like you’re buying from a dealer, but in fact, you should exercise the same degree of care as you would if buying privately. Though if the vehicle is being sold by auction on behalf of a dealer, you may still be covered by the Act.Brand and parts matter a lotNow we’ve covered off *how* to buy, we get to the fun part – *what* to buy?Many people think first about the size of car they need. Big sedan, little hatchback, or even an SUV?Think very deliberately about what you’ll really use your car for. You might fantasise about long road trips into the country, but if the reality is a daily city commute, that’s going to impact more on your choice of car and how much you enjoy it.There are many types and sizes of vehicle behind each badge. And contrary to popular belief, fuel is unlikely to be your biggest cost in a car.When it comes to routine maintenance or in the event of a disaster, the last thing you want is greater expense and delays in time because parts and equipment are so hard to source. Those rare spares might even add to your insurance premium.One of the best tips I was ever given was to stick to well-known and more common brands because it’s so much easier to find the bits and pieces you need.Think about the previous ownerWe all long for the cliché of the car that was owned by a little old lady who only drove to and from church on Sundays. But it is actually a good approach overall, to think about the kind of person who might’ve driven the car before you.This is also why it’s generally a good idea to steer away from, for example, high-performance cars.You might be draw in by their slick looks and cool appeal. And hey, you might get lucky and find one that was owned by a real enthusiast.More likely, you’ll find it was owned by someone who bought it for what it can do and pushed it to its limits accordingly.And again, there’s a good chance your insurance company knows that as well and will charge you accordingly.Mileage really mattersNo matter how good a vehicle is to begin with, or how well cared for it has been, the numbers on the odometer are arguably your best indication of how wise a purchase it will prove to be.That’s because even the best, most loved cars experience wear and tear. Cars are filled with lots of moving parts that wear out, break down, and need to be replaced.The more kilometres a car has done, the more likely it is those bits and pieces will be due for repair or replacement. And that means a cost to you.Narrow down your choice to the brand, model and year you like; then filter your options by how many kilometres they’ve travelled.Most experts will tell you a good benchmark to aim for is 15 000 – 20 000 kilometres for every year of life.But that’s particularly tough to apply in Canberra, because so many of us drive, and we drive for relatively long distances too.On the upside, our commutes and road trips tend to be longer, easier drives – with less time sitting in stop-start traffic. And that’s better for your car and less wear-and-tear on the parts.So if you’re buying a local used car, 20 000, even up to 25 000 kilometres per year, might be a more realistic aim and still a pretty safe bet.A final word on budgetFor most of us, what we can afford to pay will guide our search more than anything.Everyone loves a bargain, and no one likes the idea of being ripped off. There are various sites where you can get a good idea of the value of a car – RedBook is one of the best known.However, when it comes to used cars especially (much like in real estate), it’s really the market that sets the price. You’ll get some peace of mind if you remember that.Don’t get too caught up in what a car *should* be worth. Once you’ve settled on your model of choice, spend a bit of time trawling sites like CarsGuide, CarSales and Drive. You’ll soon get an idea of the upper and lower ends of the price ranges as well as all the averages in between.That’s your best indication of what you’ll actually have to pay.Do you have a car buying horror story of your own to share? What are your best tips for buying a first or next car?Captions: Middle, stock image sourced from http://www.todoautos.com.pe/f149/club-hyundai-excel-38093/index35.html. Above, image from https://au.pinterest.com/pin/436427020120678203.This article was first published on The Riot ACT Website by Jane Speechley https://the-riotact.com/what-to-look-for-when-buying-a-car/201150

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    6/05/2017
    How do you downsize, or declutter, your home?
    Whether you’re packing up to travel the world, or retiring into something more manageable, at some point in your life you will likely be faced with the need to downsize or declutter.The end result is nirvana – a clean and organised home housing only those belongings that you truly love. But the steps along the way can be both time consuming and frustrating, especially when you’re not sure what to do with all the “stuff”.So where do you start?Survey the scene and ask yourself:
    • How much space do I have to work with?
    • What do I absolutely need to keep?
    • What can I throw out?
    • What might family or friends want?
    • What can be sold?
    The last question can be the most difficult to answer.Almost anything can be sold, but how much is it worth? If you list it for a price no one will pay, you could spend weeks staring at it wondering whether you need to drop the price.Even worse if it sells, and you find out it was worth 10x more.Listings on Gumtree and Facebook eliminate the valuable opportunity to pit buyers against each other – which ultimately helps you get a better price. And garage sales can be painstaking.There is one way to solve both problems: put it to auction. And if you can, get a professional valuer to give you an indication of its worth before you set the reserve.We asked online auction site Allbids (based in Fyswhick) about how the auction process works, and how they help Canberrans who are downsizing or decluttering.1. Free valuationTo start, Allbids provide a free valuation service, performed by expert valuers so you can get a true indication of the value of your art, antiques, furniture, collectables, jewellery, and so on.2. Photos and listingFollowing valuation, Allbids take professional photos of everything you want to sell, and create individual listings for each item. You can opt to have it all taken away (so buyers can pick up from Allbids), or sell items straight out of your home (which works well for estate sales).3. MarketingThe reserve is set, the items are listed, so it’s time to sell!150,000 people are registered to bid on Allbids, so you immediately gain access to a huge database of locals ready to buy.But the magic happens when their far-reaching platform helps someone in New York or Hong Kong who really wants what you’re selling, find it, bid on it, and have it delivered to their door.If you want to watch the process, you can see your listing any time, and even direct friends and family to check it out.4. Sale and pickupAllbids deal with the buyers, collect the funds and handle the pick-ups. They work on commission only, which ensures they only get paid once things get sold (and they obviously work hard to get you a good price!).And that’s it! Your extra “stuff” is gone, your house is nirvana, and you’re that little bit richer. (Or a lot richer, depending on what’s in your house!)So if you’re trying to downsize, or declutter, it may be worth considering an online auction.If you would like Allbids’ help deciding what can be sold, and what it’s worth, call 02 6239 2262 or visit ALLBIDS.This article was first published on The Riot ACT Website by Rachel Ziv https://the-riotact.com/how-do-you-downsize-or-declutter-your-home/202553

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    5/05/2017
    The Lobby: ideas for future use?
    The Lobby is one of Canberra’s most iconic buildings, although on a lesser scale than the surrounding national institutions such the two Parliament Houses and the beautiful National Library of Australia. Located on national land, the National Capital Authority has responsibility for the building. Situated on King George Terrace, almost in the centre of the Parliamentary Triangle and overlooking the National Rose Garden, it is a building full of memories. Like many readers, I have been to weddings, book launches, poetry readings and memorable family get-togethers in the space. The Lobby was a restaurant and function centre for almost 50 years and was the choice of meeting place of political lobbyists with expense accounts, politicians, and senior Government officials, including the odd spook.After finally closing its doors at the beginning of the year, the future of the Lobby remains uncertain. The Lobby stopped functioning as an a la carte restaurant some years ago, although the elegant, glass-walled building had been a popular venue for weddings and functions. The attached Pork Barrel café and bakery in the kiosk part of the building attracted a day-time crowd and was well-patronised but ceased trading at the same time as The Lobby. The National Capital Authority was approached for an update about the future of the building but did not provide any information about possible future uses. I have seen references to the building being heritage-listed and if this is the case, the building should remain intact, but with an indeterminate function. The sale of all fixtures and fittings early this year means an easy transition was limited for any potential entrepreneurial local restauranteur willing to try something a bit different. Perhaps someone else, even from interstate, cashed-up from another enterprise, may tackle the space and create something that will become a go-to destination. Parking had been cited as a possible problem for the venue, but with paid parking in the Parliamentary Triangle, and the National Library car park barely 200 metres away, parking is mostly readily available. So unless the National Capital Authority can negotiate a restaurant lease, consideration should be given to repurposing the building.One idea discussed with interested parties could provide a possible solution to a long-standing issue. The ACT does not have a venue that could be described as a centre for indigenous culture for the traditional custodians and owners of the land. As The Lobby is on traditional land, surely there is room for at least a discussion that the land is returned to the traditional owners for cultural purposes. Its function could be a central repository for any collections of artefacts, or it could be easily converted into an art gallery for indigenous art, with a strong emphasis on local indigenous artists. The building is flooded with natural light and with a flexible track lighting system and moveable screens, the existing building could provide an excellent gallery space.For the time being, The Lobby sadly stands empty and just a little overgrown. At least it is not boarded up, nor the windows covered in newspaper. As we have no indication of the future of the building, it is interesting to pause and reflect on The Lobby’s past. Until 1988, it was the closest restaurant to the Australian Parliament, other than the House dining room. After Parliament moving up the hill in 1988, it inevitably became less frequented as it was no longer a quick dash across King George Terrace, and as new lobbyists and MPs came into Canberra perhaps found other restaurants more to their liking.The building was opened on 1 July 1968 by the then Federal Treasurer, a certain Mr McMahon. At the time, the Canberra Times commented it was ‘no mere hash house for coach parties’. It was anticipated it ‘would provide a sophisticated menu six nights a week’ and the décor had been ‘done by Lady (Marion) Hall Best’, interior decorator to the then rich and famous. The name was very appropriate as the restaurant was intended for lobbyists with expense accounts. The main diners were the politicians and bureaucrats who were being lobbied, although management did attempt to attract a local crowd when Parliament was not sitting. Sunday luncheons were offered as ‘a traditional Sunday dinner with ‘a grand 3-course luncheon of roast turkey or pork $3 (children $1-75), and Devonshire Tea served on Sunday afternoon’. By the end of 1969, there was a Dinner Dance each Friday night with music provided by the “Lobby Trio”.Apparently, service got off to a roaring start, and the owners were reputed to have covered all expenses within the first six weeks. A refreshment kiosk soon opened to meet the needs of tourists who were more interested in a pie and sauce. At the time of opening, there was little in the way of fine dining competition with most restaurants contained in dining rooms in motels, although I hope this statement unleashes a flurry of comments and memories of other restaurants of the era.So even though the future of The Lobby is still unknown, I wonder what personal views readers have about its future?Photos by Maryann MussaredThis article was first published on The Riot ACT Website by Maryann Mussared https://the-riotact.com/the-lobby-ideas-for-future-use/200075

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    7/04/2017
    How to raise funds for your charity or community organisation
    Raising funds for a charity or community organisation can be hard work.It’s not that Canberrans aren’t generous. In fact, according to the latest NAB Charitable Giving Index, charity donations grew by 6.3% between 2015 and 2016. Residents in Deakin were crowned the most generous with an average donation of $258 per person, and O-Connor was named the most generous suburb by percentage of income.But people can only be generous when they know who you are and what your organisation stands for. And if your charity has no marketing budget, how do you get the word out and start raising money?According to Giving Australia, the answer may lie in your ability to embrace new technologies: “In response to the decreasing effectiveness of traditional approaches, many charities are investing in technologies making it easier to give through online or digital giving.”There are a number of ways to go about this (such as Crowdfunding websites), but often charity organisers find themselves as just another number in a line of hopeful not-for-profits hoping to raise money.One company determined to change this is local auction website Allbids. CEO Rob Evans and his team help charities turn product or service donations into cash via online auctions; completely commission-free.“Charity organisers often find that Canberra businesses are very generous when it comes to supporting local causes,” says Rob. “And while they may not be able to donate lots of money, they can donate goods and services which are as good as money once sold.”According to a Giving Australia study, Australian business gave $6.2 billion to charities between 2015 and 2016. 35% of that was through goods and services, rather than financial donations. All things considered, it seems to be a no-lose situation for all. The charity gets a valuable product or service voucher that can be auctioned off for money, and the business gets a tax write-off plus a valuable opportunity to position itself as a charitable organisation.Allbids have been helping charities turn product and service donations into cash for years. Rob says Allbids services enable a charity’s silent and live auctions as part of a community event or charity dinner to reach not only the people in the room, but their database of 150,000 buyers Australia wide.“We come out to the event and set up screens so people can see what they’re bidding on,” says Rob. “Then they can either bid online on phones or tablets, or via SMS until the hammer goes down.”This will be happening at the Karinya House Charity Gala Dinner on May 5, with the auction items available on Allbids for two weeks before the event, and the final hour of the auction live at the gala.One charity organiser who can’t speak highly enough of Allbids is Martin Fisk, CEO of Menslink.Menslink is a Canberra based charity which supports young men aged 12 to 25. They provide a range of free services such as counselling, volunteering, and mentoring, and started the Silence is Deadly campaign in partnership with the Canberra Raiders.“All Menslink services are free because we never want a financial consideration to get in the way of a young man receiving help,” says Martin. “And Allbids and the Canberra community are a big part of helping us provide those free services to young men and their families.“Allbids helps us reach audiences well beyond the capacity of Menslink. We’re a very small charity, but having this platform enables us to achieve much better results than what’s possible with our own resources.”Last year, Martin and his team received a big donation from The Canberra Raiders: dinner with Ricky Stuart and the Raiders’ leadership team. They auctioned it off on Allbids and a die-hard Raiders fan from Sydney was the winning bidder.“It was really nice,” says Martin. “He and five of his family and friends came down and had a wonderful experience. We couldn’t have come close to achieving the financial result nor the reach and exposure we have had with auctions like these without Allbids.”Snowy Hydro Southcare, Ginninderra Athletics Club, RSPCA ACT, Brumbies and many other local charities have also benefitted from Allbids’ help. Last November and December they helped raise over $200,000 though charity auctions.Rob says no charity or fundraising activity is too large or small. “Give us a call or send an email and we can find a way to help you sell your donations. And it doesn’t have to be elaborate or expensive products and services. We can pretty much sell anything – from gym memberships, artwork and books, to keynote speaker and photography sessions!”For more information, call Allbids on 6239 2262 or email admin@allbids.com.au.To view products Allbids are currently auctioning for charities, visit Allbids.com.au. The Canberra Raiders-Ronald McDonald House charity auction is now on! Visit to bid on your favourite jersey, but be fast because it ends this Friday (7th April).This article was first published on The Riot ACT Website by Rachel Ziv https://the-riotact.com/how-to-raise-funds-for-your-charity-or-community-organisation/199672

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    4/04/2017
    Deceased estates: What to do with all the assets and how to know what’s valuable
    The death of prominent Canberra architect Alastair Swayn made headlines last month, when it was revealed that the proceeds from the sale of the Estate would be given to his foundation, which supports young architects and designers.But what you may not know is that the Estate includes a collection of modernist assets which are being auctioned off on Allbids this month.Andrew Whitehead, a certified valuer who works with Allbids says, “Being an architect, Alastair had many items in his house that are functional but have a definite design pedigree. He obviously spent time choosing pieces that played exceptionally well with the space he lived in.The house in itself is a rare find, but it’s been fantastic to be able to leave the pieces in their natural state inside the home so bidders can view them the way Alastair displayed them. Anyone wanting to have a look can attend the open home, and each piece has a barcode which corresponds with the online Allbids listing. After the house sale we will have one special viewing right before the hammer goes down.”The auction includes a range of Italian designer furniture, Danish lighting, artwork, personal objects and even a collection of high end Italian silk ties. Everything is up for grabs, un-reserved, on Allbids until 7pm on the 30th March.Online auctioning has become a very popular avenue for handling the assets from a deceased estate.Rob Evans, CEO of Allbids says, “The process is really quite simple, and the return can be exceptional. At no cost, we send a valuer out to the house to go through the items, talk with you and give you an idea of what it should sell for. Where possible it’s always good to leave everything in the home during the auction, so people can view them in their natural state.We’ll catalogue each item, photograph it and then market it online for you. Because we are working on commission it’s always in our best interest to obtain the best possible price for the seller.”Andrew Whitehead, experienced valuer says, “Ethically, auctioning ticks a lot of boxes for Will executors. When you piecemeal a collection and sell it on classifieds sites, to a pawn broker or through a garage sale, you have a lot less chance of obtaining market value, which for beneficiaries should be quite important. Auctioning also makes it easy for anyone interested – family, friends, acquaintances – to see what is on offer.The other important point is that you don’t often know what’s valuable. I’ve reviewed many items that people think are valuable but aren’t, and then I find a piece in the back of a cupboard that’s worth a fortune. You just never know.”You just never know is something many people are familiar with, following the increasing popularity of TV shows such as Antiques Roadshow and Pawn Brokers.A month ago Allbids managed the sale of two local estates with a vast collection of Asian antiques. Andrew, who valued them, knew they were valuable but could never have anticipated the results that were achieved.“We put the collection on the website and advertised it locally, as well as overseas. Bidders came from everywhere, including New York and Singapore. We ended up selling a pair of antique Chinese ivory carvings for just over $30,000 and a Chinese scroll painting for $23,000.”Asian antiques have exploded in value in the past decade, with many wealthy Chinese wanting to spend their money buying back items of Chinese heritage sitting in Western collections.“We have a lot of highly educated people in Canberra, many with political or diplomatic backgrounds, and they have fascinating collections,” says Rob. “Often people head to Sydney auction houses because they think it’s a bigger market and therefore a better place to sell. However, the big city markets tend to be oversupplied.There are many collectors in Canberra with money to spend, and they are very happy to be able to find quality antiques and collectables locally. This means more money in the seller’s pocket, and a lot less hassle worrying about moving their assets interstate.”And Rob’s tips for getting the best price on your assets?“Start with a low price and let the market determine the worth. Auctioning online means people from all over the world can buy your assets. We do our part in making sure that all of our items are properly catalogued, so that when collectors search for what we’re selling, they find it. And often specialist collectors have their own understanding of how valuable something is going to be in the future, so they pay a much higher price than even we may anticipate.”Those in the process of handling a deceased estate are welcome to contact Allbids for a free valuation on 6239 2262 or visit Allbids.com.au.The Alastair Swayn auction runs until the end of the month.This article was first published on The Riot ACT Website by Rachel Ziv https://the-riotact.com/deceased-estates-what-to-do-with-all-the-assets-and-how-to-know-whats-valuable/196883

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    10/03/2017
    Architect's Passion
    AllBids are currently auctioning the entire house contents of the Late Alastair Swayn AO, the Inaugural ACT Government Architect.  Offered in-situ at his residence.The selection of works of art, designer furniture and lighting, and decorative and functional objects, reflects his life’s passion for art and design.  His vocational skills applied to his own domestic interior.Almost every object is of some pedigree in the design sense, carefully picked to suit the interior space.  The items form part of a coherent design theme, rather than just a collection per se.The residence is located at Urambi Village in Kambah.  This cluster of unique dwellings is also a design classic, listed on the Register of Nationally Significant 20th Century Architecture.  The townhouse is currently for sale through Amanda Mutton, Blue Property.The proceeds of the sale, as directed by his will, are being donated to the Alastair Swayn Foundation, a foundation he set up to support architecture students.

    Read More
    7/03/2017

    Ethical Disposal

    ALLBIDS is committed to the highest standards of sustainable practice. We are ACTSMART accredited and currently implementing an internationally Environmental Management System via ISO14001.

    Ethical Disposal is about:


    REVIEW - our expert valuation team will assess your assets and advise on their potential value.

    RECOVER - our trained technicians will test and prepare assets for sale where possible.

    REUSE - all viable goods will be brought by our membership - this is the best form of recycling!

    RECYCLE - where assets have no commercial value, they will be disposed of sustainably.

    REPORT - transparent, flexible reporting will be provided to complete the ethical disposal audit trail.

    New to ALLBIDS? Watch this video!

    See why you will come to ALLBIDS! Our online Auction allows you to trade simply and with great value fees. Register today and start trading.

     
     

    Our success stories / testimonials OR don't take our word for it...

    Menslink
    Menslink

    Allbids provide an outstanding service to charities like Menslink in a number of ways.

    Firstly, Allbids helps us reach audiences well beyond the capacity of Menslink. We’re a very small charity, but having their online platform enables us to achieve much better results than what’s possible with our own resources. At our last auction - which raised over $100,000 for us - we had bidders from all around Australia bid on our items - Allbids managed the payments and collection for us without any issues.

    Secondly, Allbids staff were on hand during our Big Night Out to manage the whole process - setting out the displays, helping guests at tables bid for silent auction, managing payments - they couldn't have been more helpful.

    Finally, Allbids are always available for the items that we might get to auction from time to time - nothing is too much trouble for them.

    Their support for Menslink - and other charities - over the years has been fantastic. They've helped promote our work to their clients, helped us raise far more money from auction items than we could have alone or on other platforms and have been a delight to work with. I could not recommend them more highly and hope to continue the partnership for many years to come

    Martin Fisk

    Karinya House
    Karinya House

    I am writing to extend our sincere appreciation to ALLBids for their recent support of our 2017 Karinya House Annual Mother’s Day Gala Dinner, held on 5 May 2016. We especially thank Jo, Louise and the ALLBIDS staff who assisted with the online auction pages for Karinya House. The support also provided by Jo, Louise and the team at the event itself and post the event to finalise the auction was also outstanding and so greatly appreciated.

    Karinya House for Mothers and Babies is a community based, not for profit organisation serving the ACT and surrounding regions. In its twentieth year of operation, Karinya provides supported accommodation and outreach services to pregnant and parenting women in crises and their children. In August 2016 Karinya, with specialist funding for construction from the ACT Government, opened its new Home and transitioned to our purpose-built facility, doubling residential capacity, and creating a designated area for specialised outreach and group services. This new facility, whilst significantly enhancing service delivery, has also increased our annual operating budget.

    This is the first year we have had the availability of an Online Auction House to support the Gala Dinner. The Gala Dinner is our premier fundraising event, and it is vital to us that the event generates as much financial support as possible. We were unaware prior to be contacting by Louise, that ALLBIDS offered the Online Auction service to Not for Profit Organisations entirely free of any sales commissions or other fees and charges. We were somewhat apprehensive, as is the case with something new and untried at times, but Louise and Jo, at our first meeting were completely assured that the ALLBIDS service would be fantastic and easy. They, and the ALLBIDS processes and outcomes, did not disappoint. And the whole ALLBIDS experience and result far exceeded our expectations!

    As a community based organisation, it is important to note, that we generate around half of our operating revenue each year through financial donations and sponsorships from Corporates, Philanthropic Trusts & Foundations, local businesses, individuals and families. In addition we are supported through pro bono professional services as well as in kind material donations.

    The support of ALLBIDS through their Charity & Community Auctions service is an outstanding and innovative form of community engagement. ALLBIDS are to be congratulated on providing this wonderful service and supporting community service organisations such as Karinya House. I am pleased to confirm that for Karinya House, the addition of ALLBIDS as part of our Gala Dinner Event and Team (sorry we are claiming your team as part of our team now!) made a significant difference to the fundraising proceeds from the auction component of our Gala Dinner. Proceeds from the Auction were 73% higher than the prior year’s Gala Dinner. This is outstanding, and it certainly gives us impetus to source a greater number of donations for next year’s Gala Dinner Auctions.

    We are very thankful to have ALLBIDS as part of our Karinya family. We do hope this partnership will be one we can rely on for future events. Please extend our thanks to the ALLBIDS Board, Executive and Staff Team for the support provided for the 2017 Gala Dinner. I commend ALLBIDS for their demonstrated professional competence, experience, and dedication, as well as their generosity and example in corporate citizenship and care for some of the most vulnerable women and children in our community.

    Jo Saccasan

    Australian Customs and Border Protection
    Australian Customs and Border Protection

    ALLBIDS has had an ongoing 2 year contract partnership with Australian Customs regarding removal and disposal of The Department’s redundant IT assets nationally.

    The main type of assets being disposed of are: servers, networking equipment, Department specific equipment (eg. Passport scanners) as well as generic IT such as PCs Notebooks and Monitors.

    Over this period of time, ALLBIDS has facilitated the removal and disposal of IT assets from secure working environments in Canberra, Sydney, Brisbane, Melbourne, Adelaide & Perth.

    We also has organised and facilitated regional and remote pickups and disposals of IT equipment from areas such as Townsville, Cairns and even offshore on Thursday Island.

    ALLBIDS has also followed all security protocols for The Department in regards to removal and disposal of the IT assets.

    Matthew Smith

    Department of Parliamentary Services
    Department of Parliamentary Services

    ALLBIDS had facilitated all IT disposals for The Department over the past 5-6 years. The majority if these disposals have been from The Department here in Canberra consisting of generic IT and Department-specific assets such as servers, audio visual networking equipment & other networking assets. ALLBIDS has disposed of all redundant and refreshed IT equipment over this period and tailored asset tracking and Management Reports back to the Department in a format that integrates back into their reporting mechanism. ALLBIDS has also been fully compliant with all collection and disposal protocols in regards to asset disposal from secure working environments.

    Wayne Evans

    IP Australia
    IP Australia

    ALLBIDS has an ongoing disposal agreement in place with IP Australia since 2007. Over this time ALLBIDS had facilitated the disposal of the Department’s IT assets primarily in Canberra but from several locations around Australia including Melbourne, Sydney, Perth and Adelaide. The main asset types being disposed of have been generic IT assets (PCs, notebooks, monitors) as well as networking gear including Servers, networking switches, audio/visual equipment and other general IT assets. We have tailored reporting back to The Department to track IT asset management in a format that they can easily integrate back into their systems to close and reconcile the asset management.

    Wayne O'Brien

    Australian Bureau of Statistics
    Australian Bureau of Statistics

    Allbids has an exclusive ongoing disposal contract in place with The Department for IT disposals over the past 3-4 years from their central location here in Canberra as well as multiple sites around Australia. This Department one of our larger disposal contracts for the disposal of IT equipment and regularly dispose and manage redundant IT equipment such as generic IT (PCs, notebooks, monitors) as well as large quantities of networking equipment (servers, switches, storage arrays) and other Department-specific IT assets. Allbids regularly facilitates and organises IT disposal from Canberra, Melbourne, Sydney, Brisbane, Adelaide & Perth as well as more remote sites such as Tasmania, Northern Territory and regional areas. Allbids also tailors our asset tracking and reporting back to the Department in a format that integrates back into their asset disposal and management systems. Allbids has facilitated not just the IT asset disposal but also the collection and freight logistics required at a national level to maximise returns back to the Department.

    David Shaw

    Car Purchase
    Car Purchase

    I bought my son a ford laser on here and although it was older (1991) I didn't expect much for our $1200 spent ! Especially considering it had 12months rego. I couldn't have had a more pleasant surprise ! It's a pearler and we found out later my folks new the owner and he was a mechanic who lived opposite them and he nurtured it. It had service books up to date and it runs so so well, uses no oil or water and has brand new tyres ! It's a 1.8 ghia too . The paint is great and the interior is as new . Needless to say my son loves it and has already fitted some nice alloy wheels and a kick ass stereo. The car is Worth twice what we paid for it at retail Level ! All bids rock. Thanks !!!! This is a true testimonial by a real customer !!! I'm not the type to do this either BUT was just so impressed.

    Rotorboy68

    No hesitation recommending ALLBIDS service
    No hesitation recommending ALLBIDS service

    I approached Allbids to assist me to liquidate the plant and equipment owned by one of my clients. The client owned and operated a quarry on the outskirts of Canberra

    Following an illness the client needed to completely restructure their business, which resulted in client selling off all the business assets

    Due to the size and scale of the operation all the equipment was sold from the existing location. This saved the client valuable time and money by not having to pay removal costs and freight.

    Allbids took complete control of the whole operation and used their extensive database to access buyers. The complete process was seamless with Allbids managing all inspections, enquiries, delivery and logistics whilst providing me with a complete audit trail for each asset sold.

    I have no hesitation in recommending the services of Allbids. They turned the surplus assets of our client into cash.

    ROCKS

    Recent car purchase
    Recent car purchase

    I bought an excellent Subaru L1800 wagon via Allbids' auction site, and I want to report back that the car was in excellent condition, as described. The photos were accurate and showed what I needed to see as a potential buyer.  We were able to inspect the car on location, including starting it and letting it run, and testing the clutch and brakes.

    The staff were friendly and helpful. For me, this was a really good experience all around, and I recommend Allbids unreservedly to potential bidders.

    kobold

    Allbids is a brilliant website/service
    Allbids is a brilliant website/service

    I would like to say that Allbids is a brilliant website/service.  For our family it serves as a valuable resource in locating goods we need to buy, as well as purchasing some great bargains.  It has been a fantastic way for me to make some extra cash by selling unwanted goods that we no longer use.

    itsdone

    Furnished with items purchased from Allbids
    Furnished with items purchased from Allbids

    We are building a house and also renovating two existing cottages on a rural property. We have found Allbids to be an excellent source of materials for the renovation job - the cottages will be largely furnished with items purchased from Allbids, and we are using recycled building materials and tools - many of which are also from Allbids.

    It will be 12 months before the projects are finished but I will send you photos when complete - might be useful as an example of what can be achieved with the services of Allbids. Thanks again

    heather46

    Spreading the word to every one
    Spreading the word to every one

    I just wanted to tell you what a wonderful job Allbids is doing and that I am still spreading the word to every one I know! Allbids is providing a service that has been needed for a while and it seems to be getting better all the time!

    Again Thanks a Million

    farmergirl